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Federer calls medical timeout ‘precaution’; del Potro next

first_imgRoger Federer, of Switzerland, returns a shot against Philipp Kohlschreiber, of Germany, during the fourth round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Monday, Sept. 4, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Adam Hunger)NEW YORK — The only bit of trouble for Roger Federer in his fourth-round match at the U.S. Open was when he felt the tightening of a muscle at the back of the top of his left leg.Federer asked for a medical timeout after the second set against No. 33 seed Philipp Kohlschreiber, briefly let the court in Arthur Ashe Stadium to get a quick massage from a trainer, and soon was right back at it, finishing off his 6-4, 6-2, 7-5 victory Monday night.ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:08Palace: No need to release Duterte medical bulletin01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games In the quarterfinals, he’ll face someone who turns 29 this month and whose presence does not conjure good memories for Federer at the U.S. Open: Juan Martin del Potro.Federer is a combined 44-0 against the first four men he’s played, and he is 16-5 against del Potro. But one of those defeats came in five sets in the 2009 final at Flushing Meadows, when del Potro won his only Grand Slam title and ended Federer’s streak of five consecutive championships in New York.“Probably feels like one of those matches I would like to play over again. Feel like I would probably win it somehow,” Federer said.“I just had all these chances in multiple moments. The only time when he was really better, in my opinion, was the fifth set,” he added. “Obviously that was good enough to beat me that day. It was a good match. A lot of back and forth. Crowd was really into it. Started in the day, finished in the night.”Del Potro has gone through plenty of health problems since then, including three operations on his left wrist that forced him to miss two years’ worth of Grand Slam tournaments until Wimbledon in 2016.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief “It was more precaution. It’s all good. No problems there,” said Federer, who did not face a break point. “I’m not worried about it.”The state of the 36-year-old Federer’s physical condition has been a talking point throughout the tournament, because he tweaked his back during a match in August, interrupting his preparation for Flushing Meadows. Federer said he was worried about his movement in his first-round match against 19-year-old American Frances Tiafoe, then had timing issues in his second-rounder against 35-year-old Russian Mikhail Youzhny — and both of those contests went five sets.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutOn the bright side, the 19-time major champion also spent some time drawing a crowd by hitting in Central Park and has put together two straight-set wins in a row against opponents in their 30s.“I went from Tiafoe, then to the oldies, so that was good,” Federer joked. “Yeah, back to the ’80s.” Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension That has had an effect on his two-handed backhand, to be sure, but the righty swing that produces massive forehands and serves is still intact — as Federer himself noted at his news conference and on Twitter.That was clear as del Potro shook off the effects of a fever and erased two set points while coming back from a big deficit to eliminated No. 6 Dominic Thiem 1-6, 2-6, 6-1, 7-6 (1), 6-4.When a reporter relayed to del Potro that Federer had spoken glowingly about him, del Potro responded: “Well, of course, I admire him, too. Everybody loves him.” Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments San Miguel to play Bridgeman vs Rain or Shine, still awaiting arrival of Terrence Watson WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Read Next Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses MOST READ LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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Pietersen unlikely to return, Cook can’t handle him: Boycott

first_imgBoycott feels that Cook lacks the strong personality to handle someone like Pietersen Former England cricket team captain Geoffrey Boycott has reportedly said that an international call for Kevin Pietersen is unlikely because captain Alastair Cook “can’t handle” him.Boycott said that although Pietersen is capable of giving match-winning performances yet he can give “headaches” and therefore, one needs a captain who can handle that. He went on to say that Cook lacks the strong personality required to handle someone like Pietersen, reported Sport 24.He also said that Michael Vaughan would have handled Pietersen much better than the present England hierarchy.Thirty four-year-old Pietersen’s international career effectively ended in February following England’s 5-0 Ashes thrashing in Australia even though he was England’s all-time leading run-scorer across all formats.The move was dubbed as an attempt to support current skipper Cook.last_img read more

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Meet The Spurs Sharpshooter Who Refuses To Shoot Straight

Meet The Spurs Sharpshooter Who Refuses To Shoot Straight

Marco Belinelli has been one of the NBA’s more successful marksmen from deep the past decade. But few would suggest emulating the Italian’s often unsightly approach to shooting. The 11-year veteran has a curious habit of leaning into his jumpshots “Smooth Criminal”-style. The move puzzles even Gregg Popovich, who, as the longest-tenured American professional coach in sports, has seen just about everything by now.“It’s not a sometimes thing — he always is leaning somewhere,” said Popovich, who is coaching Belinelli for a second stint. “I don’t know who taught him that, but it can’t be untaught at this point. It’s just there.”But watch the 32-year-old dart around on offense long enough, and it becomes more clear why he does what he does. Much like an armadillo curls into a ball for protection, Belinelli leans to safeguard his shot from being blocked from behind, particularly as he comes around teammates’ screens.“It looks crazy when I’m off-balance all the time, but I just want to be quick with the ball,” said Belinelli, who’s had just two of his 265 jumpers blocked this year.1Of those two blocks, per Second Spectrum data, one resulted in an immediate putback and basket for the Spurs, while the other drew a loose-ball foul on Jimmy Butler, who’d blocked Belinelli’s shot just before. “That’s the life of a shooter, I guess.”Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/MarcosLeaners.mp400:0000:0003:45Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.It’s hard to overstate Belinelli’s offensive importance off the bench in San Antonio, which not only came into the year short-handed but also had several new faces in its experienced rotation. Aside from the trade of star Kawhi Leonard,2Danny Green was also sent to Toronto, while Tony Parker signed with Charlotte in free agency. Manu Ginobili — the 16-year warhorse who gave the Spurs’ reserves stability — retired, leaving Belinelli with even more scoring to replace.The Spurs are the NBA’s biggest shot-selection outlier, with long, midrange jumpers making up a league-high 17 percent of their shots while 3-points are an NBA-low 27.7 percent of their shots. Because of that, Belinelli’s production as a reliable perimeter shooter is welcome.His return from an early season hibernation — he shot a frigid 35 percent from the field over San Antonio’s first 25 games — lines up with the Spurs’ streak of 13 wins in 16 games, which put the team squarely back in the Western Conference playoff race. During this hot streak, Belinelli has connected on 46.8 percent of his field-goal tries, including almost 41 percent of his threes.A handful of Belinelli’s most successful tendencies are used more often by the game’s elite ball-handlers. His desire to come off screens aggressively (and with almost no space between him and his screener) is an art that Kemba Walker perfected some time ago. And he sometimes makes use of the perimeter give-and-go, which Steph Curry employed to blister the Cavs in last year’s NBA Finals.But few players, if any, shoot as well as Belinelli while using such unorthodox leans and angles. He initially developed the tendency to lean forward on a number of his jumpers when he first entered the league with Golden State, playing for Don Nelson’s up-tempo Warriors club. Because the team was always in transition, Belinelli often had forward momentum as he’d launch threes in Golden State’s offense — something that would become a habit elsewhere.As for his penchant for leaning as he comes around screens, Belinelli said that was something he took from his lone season in Chicago, where the Bulls needed him to serve as a point guard of sorts in the absence of Derrick Rose. The team didn’t have many players capable of creating their own offense, so his coaches there told him to be aggressive — and quick — about shooting when he saw daylight after getting a pick at the top of the key.Belinelli acknowledges that a fair number of his misses stem from being too off-balanced. But similar to Klay Thompson, the Spurs swingman suggested that it’s usually most important for him to square his shoulders — and less important to think about where his feet or toes are pointed as he lets it fly.Having the occasional embarrassing miss (or a seemingly impossible, completely redeeming make) simply comes with the territory in this day and age, according to J.J. Redick, the Sixers sharpshooter who was teammates with Belinelli in Philadelphia last season.“The game’s changed too much for us to stand still and wait for open shots. If we did that, we’d get maybe a shot or two each game,” Redick said of his and Belinelli’s perpetual movement. “We’re not getting many swing-swing passes where we can come straight up and down. When you’re on the move and beating someone to that spot, you’re going to be a bit off-balanced.”So next time you see Belinelli nearly falling over on a jumper, as strange as it might seem, just remember that it’s likely not an accident. More often than not, he feels like the unusual look gives him a split-second advantage on his defender.Check out our latest NBA predictions. read more

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Ohio State womens hockey wraps up Thanksgiving weekend series in Vermont with

Ohio State offensive junior Claudia Kepler (24) controls the puck during a game against Bemidji State University on Nov. 6 at St. John Arena. OSU lost 2-1. Credit: Eileen McClory | Senior Lantern ReporterThe Ohio State women’s ice hockey team split its series at the Windjammer Classic in Vermont over the weekend to conclude out-of-conference play.OSU defeated Vermont 5-2 on Friday and fell to Boston University 5-3 on Saturday. After the split, the Buckeyes (6-10-0) have one series remaining in 2015 before they resume play on Jan. 2.“It was a good experience for our kids, it was a little bit out of excitement playing out of conference opponents in a new environment and new building,” assistant coach Carson Duggan said. “But it was a lot of fun to coach in today.”On Friday, OSU fell behind early with Vermont’s sophomore defender Taylor Willard‘s third goal of the season, but OSU junior forward Katie Matheny’s second and third goals of the season powered the Buckeyes past the Catamounts in the first game of the inaugural tournament.The next day, OSU again fell behind when Boston senior forward Kayla Tutino scored on the power play at 3:58 into the game. The Terriers would score again on a buzzer beater at the end of the first, which was reviewed to determine if the puck crossed the line before time expired. “That’s why you don’t stop playing,” Duggan said. “It’s a little frustrating when you think the video says something different, but that’s why you play.”Despite dropping the second game of the invitational, the team held its collective head high after an emotional weekend. “We went in there knowing we play in the best conference out of the three in the NCAA, and we wanted to show that,” senior forward Julia McKinnon said.McKinnon, who played with fellow forwards freshman Maddy Field and sophomore Lauren Spring this weekend after playing 12 games on the blue line for the first time in her life, feels this weekend was a positive step.“Just getting our lines together and making sure that we communicate better has been huge,” McKinnon said. McKinnon, who recorded one of the first shots on goal for OSU on Saturday, said she feels the team is cycling from defense to offense with greater efficiency than it was early in the season.“Everyone is buying into the system we’ve put in place here,” McKinnon said. “And getting back on back-checking is so important, so it’s good to have some success at it.”Losers of five of six entering the weekend, the team was in agreement that the weekend away from physical conference opponents was good to assess its performance thus far.“It’s a little different playing the teams out of conference,” senior forward Kendall Curtis said. “There are some different things you see and we were switching things up today.”Curtis, along with the coaching staff, was happier with the team’s effort despite trailing early both games.“They left it all out there,” Duggan said. “They knew they weren’t going to get to play again for another two weeks or so, so they played with reckless abandon. I think they’ve come along way.“I told them after the game today I thought they played with a lot of grittiness. It was a lot of fun to be a part of and watch.”Despite scoring eight goals and splitting its series, OSU did not find its unfamiliar opponents any easier than its conference ones.“I didn’t notice a difference,” Curtis said. “I think we still really try to focus on our game, and these teams this weekend showed us something different to work on, but it didn’t really challenge us any differently than a team in our league.”Stat sheetWith two goals on Saturday, Matheny has tied her career-high of three, set last year. She has also established a new career-high in points with six so far in 2015-16.With two goals this weekend, Curtis leads with team with nine. She has eclipsed her previous career-high of eight in 2013-14.The team will return to Columbus for practice on Monday and will have its second off-week of the season. The Buckeyes are then scheduled to return to the Ice Rink for their final series of 2015 against Minnesota-Duluth on Dec. 11 and 12.  Puck is scheduled to drop at 7:07 p.m. and 4:07 p.m., respectively. read more

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Ohio State womens lacrosse edges out Michigan for programrecord 8th straight win

OSU women’s lacrosse members celebrate a win over Maryland on May 1. Credit: Courtesy of Ben SolomanThe No. 15 Ohio State women’s lacrosse team started its in-conference season on the right foot with a 10-9 win over Michigan in snowy Ann Arbor, Michigan, on Saturday. The hard-fought battle between the Buckeyes and the Wolverines allowed OSU to improve to 10-1, setting the program record with eight consecutive wins and the best start to a season.Senior attackman Cian Dabrowski led the Buckeyes with three goals on the day, while sophomore attackman Molly Wood and junior midfielder Paulina Constant each contributed two.OSU trailed 3-1 in the first half, but the defense held the Michigan attack while the offense tied it up with consecutive goals from Dabrowski and Wood. The Buckeyes led 4-3 going into halftime when senior attackman Rainey Hodgson found Wood for the score with two minutes left.The Buckeyes lost the lead again after the intermission, though, trailing 6-5 with 21 minutes left. But the Buckeyes clicked from there.Over the next 12 minutes, OSU scored five consecutive goals to give it a 10-6 lead. Constant started the trend with an unassisted goal with under 19 on the clock before Dabrowski and Hodgson added one each. With 10 minutes left, freshman midfielder Mackenzie Maring got into the action by scooping up a rebound from Wood’s shot to make it 9-6. Constant then added the 10th and final goal about a minute later.It certainly seemed like with the four-goal lead and all the momentum in the Buckeyes’ favor, the game was pretty well at hand. But, desperately trying to defend its home turf against its archrival, Michigan clawed back to make it a game again.The Wolverines notched three goals over the final seven minutes, the last of which put them one goal behind the Buckeyes with 23 seconds remaining. After a timeout, Dabrowski came in clutch with a draw control to help OSU run out the clock and hold on to the victory. Senior goalkeeper Katie Fredrick made four saves on the day.OSU beat Michigan for the fourth consecutive time, and the Wolverines fell to 5-7 on the season and 0-1 in Big Ten play.Up nextThe Buckeyes are next scheduled to return to Columbus to welcome No. 9 Penn State at 4 p.m. on Saturday. The game is set to be played at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

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Softball 5foot5 Alex Bayne has Texassized power preparing for senior season

OSU then-junior Alex Bayne (2) is welcomed by her teammates at home plate after hitting a home run during a game against Penn State on April 6 at Buckeye Field. Credit: Lantern File PhotoAbout 20 miles south of Houston, in the small town of Manvel, Texas, Edith Applegate walked her 10-year-old granddaughter Alex Bayne home from elementary school.As the pair walked up the driveway, a young Bayne pranced up toward the house that stood on 5 acres of land. She patiently sat, waited for her parents to get home from work, and thought about her upcoming dance recital.Later that night, she would play catch with her father, David, as her mother Joni looked on. As the ball hit the glove that was bigger than her head, Bayne knew almost immediately this was something she would want to do for a long time.Fast forward to a decade later, Bayne crosses home plate at Buckeye Field, pauses at the dish, firing an imaginary bow and arrow into the outfield. She just hit her second three-run home run of the game against Maryland, giving the team a 12-2 lead in the 2016 Big Ten opener.These would be just two of the 19 home runs she slugged in her junior season for the Ohio State softball team, leading the team and tying a single-season school record.But before Bayne was leading the Buckeyes in home runs, she was told by multiple schools that she was just too small to succeed in their programs.“It’s kind of ironic now,” said Bayne, who is now entering her senior season. “There were times when schools would literally tell me they were looking for someone with bigger stature or someone with a little more power in their bat.”At 5-foot-5 inches tall, Bayne might not be the biggest player on the field, but she sure does pack a punch. What she lacks in size, she makes up for in drive and determination.“With a small stature, she is still our strongest player in the weight room,” said coach Kelly Kovach Schoenly. “She absolutely crushes it in there.”Bayne learned her drive and focus from an early age.As an Associated Press and Texas scholar during her high-school career, Bayne was able to excel in both academics and athletics, while still maintaining a social life. She learned to prioritize what was most important with the help of her parents. It also helped that Bayne had an immense interest in learning.“It sounds kind of geeky, but I loved it and I still do,” Bayne said. “My parents helped me to learn that education is the most important thing. They taught me that if you excel in your education, you’ll be able to play softball and still hang out with friends.”Joining an 18-and-under league by the age of 14, Bayne realized she had the talent to play at the next level. After what felt like hundreds of emails and handwritten letters to coaches all across the country, she found herself at Marshall University for her freshman year of college.While falling in love with the community atmosphere of Marshall University that reminded Bayne a lot of home, the program wound up not being the right fit. As a result, she would take the year off from softball during what would have been her sophomore season, giving Bayne time to refocus and regain a passion for the sport.It was during this time that Bayne discovered OSU. After numerous visits with her then-boyfriend, now-fiancé Bryce Calvin, who was a student at OSU, Bayne felt a special connection with the university.“I fell in love with the school, the traditions and how everyone strives for excellence here,” Bayne said. “You don’t come to Ohio State to be average. You come here to be awesome academically and athletically. I knew this is where I wanted to be and the people I wanted to surround myself with.”Having already made her transfer academically, Bayne then looked to join the Buckeyes’ softball team. After numerous emails with the coaches, Bayne came in for one of the team’s open tryouts, where she impressed enough to become a member of the team.“At the time we really didn’t have a lot of room on our roster, but there was something about Alex; a spark and determination that we couldn’t turn down,” Kovach Schoenly said. “I really didn’t know how she would fit in or develop, but we took the chance.”The rest is history. Through long hours and steady focus, Bayne has made herself into one of the best power hitters Ohio State has ever seen. She attributes much of her success to the advice she has received from hitting coach Jenna Hall and strength coach Andres Britton.“She bought into the training program and puts all her energy and focus into it and it has paid off,” Britton said. “She takes her time and makes sure she gets the most out of every training session. She embraces the process, trusts in the program and has a tremendous work ethic and positive attitude.”While acknowledging the schools that overlooked her for her lack of power, Bayne does not hold a grudge. Rather, she is grateful.“I’m very happy with where I am,” Bayne said. “If they hadn’t have passed on me, I wouldn’t have worked my way here to where I am today. Now I’m just like ‘Hey, I’m still 5-foot-5, but I do have power.’”With just one year of eligibility left, Bayne has big goals for herself and her team in her final season. While wanting to limit strikeouts, make herself a harder out and become a better leader, the main thing on her mind is making the postseason. “The most important thing to me in my senior season is knowing I helped this team get to where we wanted to go, regardless of my recognition,” Bayne said. “That is what would make me have a happy and fulfilling senior year.” read more

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Football Raekwon McMillan feels like an underdog in draft process past says

OSU junior linebacker Raekwon McMillan leads a group of Buckeyes into the locker room before the start of the Fiesta Bowl on Dec. 31. The Buckeyes lost 31-0. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorWhen former Ohio State linebacker Raekwon McMillan arrived in Columbus for spring practice in 2014, he was in line to earn significant playing time as a true freshman the coming fall.He did just that, and became a reliable force in the middle of OSU’s national championship-winning defense.Now after two more years — both as a starter and one as a team captain — McMillan feels somewhat overlooked as he makes the turn toward becoming an NFL draft pick.“I kind of went into the draft process as an underdog,” McMillan said. “And it is what it is. I came here to show everybody what I had to do. Me personally, I don’t feel that there’s a guy that’s better than me in this (class).”McMillan was one of the most consistent and productive linebackers since OSU coach Urban Meyer arrived in Columbus in 2012. The former five-star recruit from Hinesville, Georgia, had 275 total tackles with the Buckeyes, including two seasons when he led the team with 119 and 102. He filled a gap at middle linebacker in 2014 with then-senior linebacker Curtis Grant, and then immediately assumed the role of defensive field general as soon as Grant exited the program.Much of the criticism McMillan has received is in respect to his athleticism and speed. At times, pass coverage has been an issue, as well as getting off blocks and stopping the run. His last two games as a Buckeye — combining for 31 tackles, 2.5 tackles for loss and 1 sack — made lasting impressions on NFL teams in search of a linebacker. Couple that with his performance in the NFL combine and OSU’s pro day last week, and McMillan believes he’s done enough to discredit the critics.“Everybody saying I can’t move, saying I’m not an athlete,” he said. “I went out to the combine and ran a 4.61. I was trying to crack 4.5, but didn’t do it. Came out here, moved, vertical jump 33 (inches), 10 (foot) 1 (inch) broad jump — what else do you want from me?”McMillan said he has met with several teams and will continue to travel to “anybody who needs a linebacker” in the coming month before the NFL draft on April 27. Before the pro day last Thursday, McMillan spoke to New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick and New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton. After the de-facto tryout, McMillan sat down with the head coaches and the general managers of the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Tennessee Titans.The linebacker said he was a little intimidated by future Hall of Famer Belichick at first, having never met him and only talking to position staff initially.“You’re scared because he’s quizzing you,” McMillan said. “It’s like a little test. After we get done with the test or quiz of drawing up the defense, they’re real down-to-earth people and really cool.”McMillan was close with former OSU linebackers coach and co-defensive coordinator Luke Fickell. Now that Fickell is the head coach at the University of Cincinnati, Greg Schiano has taken over the sole defensive coordinator duties for the time being and is responsible for making redshirt senior linebacker Chris Worley the next great middle linebacker at OSU.“We lost what I think is a man’s man in Raekwon McMillan,” Schiano said on the second day of spring practice. “Just a really fine football player and a smart football player. We needed to make sure that we could try and replace him with a guy that has that kind of presence about him.”It’s not uncommon for a player so productive and well-respected to fall to the middle rounds of the NFL draft. But it’s a predicament that McMillan isn’t accustomed to.“I’m a first-two-days guy,” he said. “Anything past that, I’ll be disappointed in myself because I didn’t do it as much as I could to help myself on draft day.” read more

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Gerrard blames officials for Rangers loss

Gerrard blames officials for Rangers loss

first_imgSteven Gerrard has attributed his side’s 1-0 loss at Celtic in the first Old Firm clash of the season to poor refereeing decisions.Olivier Ntcham’s 62nd-minute strike was all Celtic needed to win the game and maintain their unbeaten run over their Glaswegian rivals to a record 12 games in all competitions.But Gerrard feels his side were on the wrong end of the game’s key moment, with Ryan Jack colliding with Tom Rogic in the build-up to Ntcham’s crucial strike.Mikey Johnston, CelticJohnston is disappointed after being injured Manuel R. Medina – September 11, 2019 Celtic winger Mikey Johnston was disappointed to miss Scotland Under 21 national team’s victories over San Marino and Croatia, and he hopes he can return to play soon.Gerrard said: “It’s definitely a foul. I’ve been around the game a very long time, and that’s a foul in my book. It’s actually a foul in the fourth official’s book as I can hear him going down the mic, ‘Foul, Foul, Foul’.“The referee’s ignored the information and they go and score a goal. I just went in and had a calm chat. I wondered why he hasn’t seen a clear swipe from Rogic on Jack. It’s blatant. For me it’s 100 per cent a foul.“If we’d lost the game with a moment of class or brilliance from Celtic I’d have held my hands up, but the referee’s cost us for sure.”last_img read more

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